About the Music We Use in Neurodynamic Breathwork

About the Music We Use in Neurodynamic Breathwork

Music inspires, supports, connects, expresses, and some say…even heals. It’s no wonder so many people ask us about the music we use during our sessions here at Neurodynamic Breathwork Online. As music listeners & breathers, we often want to relive and capture those moments of peace or release experienced in session.

Each of Our Facilitators Creates the Sets They Play

The music for each Breathwork Online session is typically crafted by that session’s facilitator. Music selection and compilation is an individual process, underpinned by training and craft. Each facilitator brings their own focus, attention, and personality to song selection. They may use an entire song or just a snippet. Because language tends to pull you back towards your logical, left-brain, traditional music with lyrics is typically not used, so words may be cut from a part of music. As a result of this crafting process, we do not keep specific track lists or sets.

The Different Phases of a Neurodynamic Breathwork Musical Journey

When creating a “set” to play in one of our sessions, facilitators select different music to support each portion of your breathwork experience. The early music tends to be world drumming and trance music with strong rhythm to help you get your breathing rhythm established and to help you get into a trance state. The music from the middle of the session is called “journey music” and while it still has rhythm, it is much more melodic to help deepen into the journey. The final third of the music slows down and is very heartful, leading into the final few meditative songs, which are “instrumental” in helping you gently move back out of the session.

We Teach Our Method of Music Selection In Our Facilitator Training Program

In our facilitator training program we teach the principles of putting together music sets for breathwork journeys. We spend one of our two music training sessions by having all trainees bring songs that they love and want to contribute to a collective group music set. Then we put it all together as a group and breathe to it!

Some Of the Artists and Songs We Use

During the first part of the session, we often use music by Byron Metcalf, who is a shamanic journey music composer (for example, we use Byron’s “True Ground” as a first track in a couple of the sets). [Listen to an interview Michael did with Byron]  Then, we might use various movie soundtracks and music by Hans Zimmer. In the later stages of the set, you might hear sacred chant or other relaxing heart-opening tracks.

Want to Explore Breathwork Music More?

For those of you interested in finding a particular track, or in exploring some of the amazing inspiring music used, Music for Breathwork is a site that has music for a different type of breathwork (Holotropic); many of the tracks that we use, but not all, are on this website: https://musicforbreathwork.com

Have Fun!

We wish you happy exploring. May you find music that inspires and supports as you continue to process and integrate your breathwork session!

Suggestion For You

And if you don’t find that song you are looking for, take a minute to journal about how the song made you feel, why you were drawn to it, what happened in session. Write about what you are taking from the moment. Dive into the emotion of the song. That feeling is available to you always, whether you track down the mix/snippet/song that supported the moment or not.

If you would like to try a free Online Breathwork session, please go here.

Our live, virtual Neurodynamic Breathwork Online sessions are hosted using the Zoom conferencing software and last approximately 100 minutes.  We offer sessions 6 – 7 times per week, so this is a great modality if you want to create a regular breathwork practice. Click here to find out more about our online breathwork process.

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